Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Collect for the Feast of Christ the King

Almighty ever-living God,
whose will is to restore all things in your beloved Son,
      the King of the universe,
grant, we pray, that the whole creation, set free from slavery,
may render your majesty service
      and ceaselessly proclaim your praise.
Through. . . .

Omnipotens sempiterne Deus,
qui in dilecto Filio tuo, universorum Rege,
omnia instaurare voluisti,
concede propitius,
ut tota creatura, a servitute liberata,
tuæ maiestati deserviat ac te sine fine collaudet.
Per. . . .

     Collect, Last Sunday in Ordinary Time/Feast of  Christ the King, Missale Romanum, 1970- ; Missale Romanum of Paul VI?

Omnipotens sempiterne Deus, qui in dilecto Filio tuo, universorum Rege, omnia instaurare voluisti, concede propitius; ut cunctæ familiæ Gentium, peccati vulnere disgregatæ, ejus suavissimo subdantur imperio:  Qui tecum. . . .

     Collect, Last Sunday of October/Feast of Christ the King.  =Bruylants no. 785.  Bruylants gives (other than Eph 1:10, below) no pre-20th-century source, and neither version of the prayer is present in Corpus orationum before the Missale Romanum of 1970 ff. (CO 12, p. 180 (186/2 521); CO 13, p. 178 (no. 529)).

Almighty and everlasting God, whose will it is to restore all things in thy well-beloved Son, the King of kings and Lord of lords:  Mercifully grant that the peoples of the earth, divided and enslaved by sin, may be freed and brought together under his most gracious rule; who liveth and reigneth with thee. . . .

Almighty and everlasting God, whose will it is to restore all things in your well-beloved Son, the King of kings and Lord of lords:  Mercifully grant that the peoples of the earth, divided and enslaved by sin, may be freed and brought together under his most gracious rule; who lives and reigns with you. . . .

     Collect for the Sunday closest to November 23, Book of common prayer (1979).

Almighty Father,
whose will is to restore all things
in your beloved Son, the King of all:
govern the hearts and minds of those in authority,
and bring the families of the nations,
divided and torn apart by the ravages of sin,
to be subject to his just and gentle rule;
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.

     Third Sunday before Advent, Common worship (Church of England).

Eph 1:9-12:
. . . ut notum faceret nobis sacramentum voluntatis suae secundum bonum placitum eius quod proposuit in eo in dispensationem plenitudinis temporum instaurare omnia in Christo quae in caelis et quae in terra sunt in ipso in quo etiam sorte vocati sumus praedestinati secundum propositum eius qui omnia operatur secundum consilium voluntatis suae ut simus in laudem gloriae eius. . . .
Lumen gentium 36 (where there is also or only (?) a quotation from the Preface to the Feast of Christ the King):

Gaudium et spes 39 (where there is also or only (?) a quotation from the Preface to the Feast of Christ the King):


Saturday, November 22, 2014

Further up and further in?

     "Was there, after all, ever any green door in the wall at all?
     "I do not know. I have told his story as he told it to me. There are times when I believe that Wallace was no more than the victim of the coincidence between a rare but not unprecedented type of hallucination and a careless trap, but that indeed is not my profoundest belief. You may think me superstitious, if you will, and foolish; but, indeed, I am more than half-convinced that he had in truth, an abnormal gift, and a sense, something—I know not what—that in the guise of wall and door offered him an outlet, a secret and peculiar passage of escape into another and altogether more beautiful world. At any rate, you will say, it betrayed him in the end. But did it betray him? There you touch the inmost mystery of these dreamers, these men of vision and the imagination. We see our world fair and common, the hoarding and the pit. By our daylight standard he walked out of security into darkness, danger, and death.
     "But did he see like that?"

     H. G. Wells, "The door in the wall," The door in the wall, and other stories (1911), as reprinted in Tales of the unexpected (London:  Collins, [1922]), 209-210; and The complete short stories of H. G. Wells, ed. John Hammond (London:  J. M. Dent, 1998), 583-584.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

"if we do not look exclusively to Jesus Christ and therefore to God we lose the capacity on this basis to think inclusively."

"wer nicht exklusiv auf Jesus Christus und so auf Gott blicken will, der verliert eben damit die Fähigkeit, von ihm aus inklusiv zu denken!"

     Karl Barth, CD IV/1, par. 57, trans. Bromiley & Torrance, p. 58.  =KD IV/1, par. 57, p. 61.  German from the Digital Karl Barth Library.

Monday, November 17, 2014

Happiness uninterrupted and complete

Give to us, we pray, O Lord our God,
always to rejoice in your devotion,
because perpetual and complete is [our] felicity
if we serve continually the author of all goods.
Through.

Da nobis, quaesumus, Domine Deus noster,
in tua semper devotione gaudere,
quia perpetua est et plena felicitas,
si bonorum omnium iugiter serviamus auctori.
Per.

     Collect for the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time.
     This is no. 934 in Corpus orationum, which traces it back to the Veronese or "Leonine sacramentary" (Cod. Bibl. Capit. Veron. LXXXV [80]) written in the early 7th century, but containing prayers dating back into the early 5th (400-440 according to the ODCC).  But is is also no. 2599 (sacramentaries from the 8th century and later):

Fac nos, quaesumus, domine deus noster, in tua devotione gaudere, quia perpetua est et plena felicitas, si bonorum omnium serviamus auctori.

Cause us, we pray, O Lord our God, always to rejoice in your devotion, because perpetual and complete is [our] felicity if we serve continually the author of all goods.  Through.

The former is mistranslated in the 2010 Missal as:

Grant us, we pray, O Lord our God,
the constant gladness of being devoted to you,
for it is full and lasting happiness
to serve with constancy
the author of all that is good.
Through.

And, according to Fr. Z, in the 1973 Missal as:

Father of all that is good, keep us faithful in serving you, for to serve you is our lasting joy.


Saturday, November 15, 2014

Albert the Great, prostrate in death as in life

"when one asked, out of devotion, to see his body in its tomb, one found it, not lying on its back, as it had been laid out according to custom, but prostrate, face to the earth, in the attitude that [Master Albert] adopted in life for prayer."

     L'histoire de saint Thomas d'Aquin de Guillaume de Tocco:  Traduction française du dernier état du texte (1323), chap. 14 (Sagesses chrétiennes, trans. Claire Le Brun-Gouanvic (Paris:  Les Éditions du Cerf, 2005), 44).

"Cuius corpus pre deuotionis gratia requisitum in tumba quod positum fuerat, ut est consuetudo, supinum, inuentum est, ut sibi moris erat dum uiueret, quasi in oratione procumbens,"

     Ystoria sancti Thome de Aquino de Guillaume de Tocco (1323), chap. 14, ed. Claire le Brun-Gouanvic, Studies and texts 127 (Toronto:  Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1996), 119.  According to le Brun-Gouanvic, these lines were not present in the first (of the four) "editions" of Tocco's text, as represented by F (Florence, Biblioteca Nazionale, Conv. Soppr. J. VII.27).  Cf. the Ystoria sancti Thome de Aquino ed. Prümmer, chap. 13 (=Fontes vitae S. Thomae Aquinatis, vol. 2, p. 80).

Friday, November 14, 2014

Greene, on violence as potentially "an imperfection of charity"

"'The Church is in the world, it is part of the suffering in the world, and though Christ condemned the disciple who struck off the ear of the high priest's servant, our hearts go out in sympathy to all who are moved to violence by the suffering of others.  The Church condemns violence, but it condemns indifference more harshly. Violence can be the expression of love, indifference never. One is an imperfection of charity, the other the perfection of egoism.  In the days of fear, doubt, and confusion, the simplicity and loyalty of one apostle advocated a political solution.  He was wrong, but I would rather be wrong with Saint Thomas than right with the cold and the craven.  Let us go up to Jerusalem and die with him.'"

     The priest at the "Mass for Joseph and the other dead men (all three were Catholics), and Jones, whose beliefs were not known," on Jn 11:16, in Graham Greene, The comedians III.iv.4 ((New York:  Viking Press, 1966), 305).

"blood libel"

     "This pre-Christian material suggests that Anidjar's main argument is indefensible.  The documentary record discredits Blood at every crucial point."

     David Van Dusen on "the superficiality of [Anidjar's] knowledge", in a review of Blood:  a critique of Christianity (New York:  Columbia University Press, 2014) entitled "Red cells and grey," Times literary supplement no. 5818 (October 3, 2014):  32.