Monday, July 18, 2011

"a teacher who does not transmit the two Testaments in their unity is a murderer of souls."

"Duo uero ubera propterea dixit quoniam hic qui se doctorem profitetur, et animarum nutritorem, nisi de utroque testamento docuerit auditores, id est uetus et nouum ab uno omnipotenti Deo processisse, homicida effictur animarum."

"Indeed, the two breasts were referred to because he who considers himself a doctor and nurturer of souls, unless he has taught [his] hearers about each Testament, i.e. that the Old and the New have come from the one omnipotent God, [he] is made a murderer of souls."

Aponius, In canticvm canticorvm expositionem VI.27 (ll. 302-306) (CCSL 19, p. 149, and SC 421, p. 156; cf. PLS 1, col. 901), on Song of Songs 4:5, as quoted in Paolo Prosperi, “Novum in vetere latet.  Vetus in novo patet:  toward a renewal of typological exegesis,” Communio:  international Catholic review 37, no. 3 (Fall 2010):  393 (389-424).  PLS 1 has "hic [qui se] doctorem profitetur, et animarum nutritorem, nisi de utroque testamento docuerit auditores, id est, vetus et novum ab uno omnipotenti Deo processisse, homicida animarum est."  Other variants in CCSL 19.  There is much more of value here in context.

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