Friday, August 20, 2010

In all things and above all things

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O God, who have prepared
     for those who love you
good things which
     no eye can see,
fill our hearts, we pray,
     with the warmth of your love,
so that, loving you in all things
     and above all things,
we may attain your promises,
which surpass every human desire.

     Collect, Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Missale Romanum and Liturgia horarum, as re-translated in 2010.  From the mid-8th-century Gelasian sacramentary (ed. Mohlberg, p. ; ed. Wilson, p. 224Corpus orationum no. 1532; Bruylants, vol. 2, no. 323):

Deus, qui diligentibus te bona invisibilia præparasti,
infunde cordibus nostris tui amoris affectum,
ut, te in omnibus et super omnia diligentes,
promissiones tuas, quæ omne desiderium superant,
consequamur.

The earlier "translation" ran as follows:

God our Father,
may we love you in all things and above all things
and reach the joy you have prepared for us
beyond all our imagining.

My translation (which retains the felicitous ambiguity of consequamur):

O God, you who have prepared for those who love you invisible goods, pour into our hearts the affection of your love, with the result that, loving you in all things and above all things, we pursue/obtain your promises, which surpass every desire.

1549 Book of common prayer:

God, whiche haste prepared to them that loue thee suche good thynges as passe all mannes understanding; Powre into our hartes such loue toward thee, that we louying thee in al thinges, may obteine thy promises, whiche excede all that we canne desyre; . . .


Collect, Sixth Sunday after Trinity.  The first and second prayer books of Edward VI, Everyman's library no. 448 (1938 [1910]), p. 146.

1928 Book of common prayer:

O God, who hast prepared for those who love thee such good things as pass man's understanding; Pour into our hearts such love toward thee, that we, loving thee above all things, may obtain thy promises, which exceed all that we can desire; . . .

Collect, Sixth Sunday after Trinity.  "The Collect for this Sunday is the first of a series of Collects adopted by the Gregorian Sacramentary from the Gelasian for the post-Pentecost Sundays.  In the Gelasian Sacramentary there were sixteen Masses for ordinary Sundays, and our Collects follow the order of these from this Sunday through the Twenty-first Sunday, with the exception of the Seventeenth Sunday.  The source of inspiration of this particular Collect is undoubtedly 1 Cor. ii.9 (a free quotation of Isaiah lxiv.4)" (Massey Hamilton Shepherd, Jr., The Oxford American Prayer book commentary (New York, NY:  Oxford University Press, 1950), 197).

1979 Book of common prayer:

O God, who has prepared for those who love thee such good things as pass man's understanding:  Pour into our hearts such love toward thee, that we, loving thee in all things and above all things, may obtain thy promises, which exceed all that we can desire. . . .


O God, you have prepared for those who love you such good things as surpass our understanding:  Pour into our hearts such love towards you, that we, loving you in all things and above all things, may obtain your promises, which exceed all that we can desire. . . .

Collect, Sixth Sunday of Easter.  "The inspiration for this collect is undoubtedly 1 Corinthians 2:9.  The prayer is found in several Gallican books:  the Missale Gothicum as an opening collect (no. 519); the Missale Francorum as a prayer to be read after the Old Testament lection (no. 121); and the Celtic Stowe Missal as one of the two prayers printed for use before the Epistle.  In the Gelasian sacramentary it is the first in a series of propers for ordinary Sundays (no. 1178), and in the supplement to the Gregorian for use on the sixth Sunday after (the) Pentecost (octave) (no. 1144).  In the Sarum missal and earlier Prayer Books this collect was used on the sixth Sunday after Trinity.  In 1549 Cranmer substituted 'such good things as pass all understanding' for 'invisible good things.'  The Latin original had 'loving you in all things and above all things;' the 1549 version retained only the phrase 'in all things' and the 1662 revision substituted 'above all things.'  The present revision moves the collect appropriately to the Easter season with the original phrase restored.  In the Latin there is a distinction between the uses of the word 'love' in this collect.  The word in the phrases 'those who love' and 'taht we, loving' is related to the verb diligere, the root meaning of which is 'to choose.'  This has to do with an act of the will.  We pray that God may pour into our hearts the affect of such love (tui amoris affectum), which is rooted in an emotion (amore—love), that we may obtain the promises.  The prayer recalls 1 John 4:19, 'We love, because he first loved us'" (Marion J. Hatchett, Commentary on the American Prayer book (New York, NY:  The Seabury Press, 1980), 182).

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